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French Cow Gets Happy Ending After Daring Slaughterhouse Escape

French Cow Gets Happy Ending After Daring Slaughterhouse Escape


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A burger-bound cow went on the lam, and this time the story has a happy ending

The Internet came to the rescue of a daring French cow who escaped a slaugtherhouse.

Even meat-eaters love to root for the underdog when a plucky cow escapes from a slaughterhouse and goes on the run, but those stories don’t tend to have very happy endings. It’s not that hard to hunt a cow, after all. One daring escapee bucked that trend this summer when she shook off her captors and made a break for it, and now her story has drawn out so many supporters that she gets to live.

According to The Local, the cow was in an abattoir and scheduled for slaughter in southeastern France on June 30 when she broke free from her handlers, went on a rampage throughout the building, and burst out a door to freedom. She managed to escape to a grassy area outside before a tracker caught her with a tranquilizer dart and re-captured her. That was a lucky turn of events for the cow, though, because once she’d had a dose of tranquilizer her meat was legally considered unfit for human consumption, so she got a stay of execution until the drug left her system.

In that time, however, her story went viral. The Internet dubbed her “Cornette, the cow that refused to die.” Internet fans gathered 2,000 euros, or about $2,200, to buy the cow from her owners and have her transported to a farm outside Paris where city children are taught about farming. Cornette is now pregnant and will live out her life, together with her calf, at a sunny farm teaching schoolchildren about animals, which is basically the happiest ending a person can imagine for a cow.


Let's Meet the Meat

There is a curious phenomenon in commercials in which edible animals or the post-prepared food and drink is given intelligence and the power of speech. And it wants humans to eat it. Or at least, others of its kind.

The title comes from the Dish of the Day sequence in Douglas Adams' The Restaurant at the End of the Universe, of The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy series. At the Restaurant, Arthur Dent is horrified to discover that the Dish of the Day is an intelligent herbivore bred to find fulfillment in being consumed. The cruelty, the Dish of the Day explains, lies not in eating animals, but in eating animals or plants who don't want to be eaten. Ironically, several science-fiction works written since have played this idea straight, often crossed with I'm a Humanitarian for maximum Nightmare Fuel.

There is, naturally, a great deal of cross-over with Carnivore Confusion. May also overlap with Fridge Horror, and more often than not with Cargo Envy. Can be horrifying, sick, or kind of funny depending on the person. For some reason, though, it is rarely Justified Trope by using fruit, which quite logically should want to be eaten so that the seeds will be spread.

The animal may start having second thoughts if it has a Veal Realization.


Let's Meet the Meat

There is a curious phenomenon in commercials in which edible animals or the post-prepared food and drink is given intelligence and the power of speech. And it wants humans to eat it. Or at least, others of its kind.

The title comes from the Dish of the Day sequence in Douglas Adams' The Restaurant at the End of the Universe, of The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy series. At the Restaurant, Arthur Dent is horrified to discover that the Dish of the Day is an intelligent herbivore bred to find fulfillment in being consumed. The cruelty, the Dish of the Day explains, lies not in eating animals, but in eating animals or plants who don't want to be eaten. Ironically, several science-fiction works written since have played this idea straight, often crossed with I'm a Humanitarian for maximum Nightmare Fuel.

There is, naturally, a great deal of cross-over with Carnivore Confusion. May also overlap with Fridge Horror, and more often than not with Cargo Envy. Can be horrifying, sick, or kind of funny depending on the person. For some reason, though, it is rarely Justified Trope by using fruit, which quite logically should want to be eaten so that the seeds will be spread.

The animal may start having second thoughts if it has a Veal Realization.


Let's Meet the Meat

There is a curious phenomenon in commercials in which edible animals or the post-prepared food and drink is given intelligence and the power of speech. And it wants humans to eat it. Or at least, others of its kind.

The title comes from the Dish of the Day sequence in Douglas Adams' The Restaurant at the End of the Universe, of The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy series. At the Restaurant, Arthur Dent is horrified to discover that the Dish of the Day is an intelligent herbivore bred to find fulfillment in being consumed. The cruelty, the Dish of the Day explains, lies not in eating animals, but in eating animals or plants who don't want to be eaten. Ironically, several science-fiction works written since have played this idea straight, often crossed with I'm a Humanitarian for maximum Nightmare Fuel.

There is, naturally, a great deal of cross-over with Carnivore Confusion. May also overlap with Fridge Horror, and more often than not with Cargo Envy. Can be horrifying, sick, or kind of funny depending on the person. For some reason, though, it is rarely Justified Trope by using fruit, which quite logically should want to be eaten so that the seeds will be spread.

The animal may start having second thoughts if it has a Veal Realization.


Let's Meet the Meat

There is a curious phenomenon in commercials in which edible animals or the post-prepared food and drink is given intelligence and the power of speech. And it wants humans to eat it. Or at least, others of its kind.

The title comes from the Dish of the Day sequence in Douglas Adams' The Restaurant at the End of the Universe, of The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy series. At the Restaurant, Arthur Dent is horrified to discover that the Dish of the Day is an intelligent herbivore bred to find fulfillment in being consumed. The cruelty, the Dish of the Day explains, lies not in eating animals, but in eating animals or plants who don't want to be eaten. Ironically, several science-fiction works written since have played this idea straight, often crossed with I'm a Humanitarian for maximum Nightmare Fuel.

There is, naturally, a great deal of cross-over with Carnivore Confusion. May also overlap with Fridge Horror, and more often than not with Cargo Envy. Can be horrifying, sick, or kind of funny depending on the person. For some reason, though, it is rarely Justified Trope by using fruit, which quite logically should want to be eaten so that the seeds will be spread.

The animal may start having second thoughts if it has a Veal Realization.


Let's Meet the Meat

There is a curious phenomenon in commercials in which edible animals or the post-prepared food and drink is given intelligence and the power of speech. And it wants humans to eat it. Or at least, others of its kind.

The title comes from the Dish of the Day sequence in Douglas Adams' The Restaurant at the End of the Universe, of The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy series. At the Restaurant, Arthur Dent is horrified to discover that the Dish of the Day is an intelligent herbivore bred to find fulfillment in being consumed. The cruelty, the Dish of the Day explains, lies not in eating animals, but in eating animals or plants who don't want to be eaten. Ironically, several science-fiction works written since have played this idea straight, often crossed with I'm a Humanitarian for maximum Nightmare Fuel.

There is, naturally, a great deal of cross-over with Carnivore Confusion. May also overlap with Fridge Horror, and more often than not with Cargo Envy. Can be horrifying, sick, or kind of funny depending on the person. For some reason, though, it is rarely Justified Trope by using fruit, which quite logically should want to be eaten so that the seeds will be spread.

The animal may start having second thoughts if it has a Veal Realization.


Let's Meet the Meat

There is a curious phenomenon in commercials in which edible animals or the post-prepared food and drink is given intelligence and the power of speech. And it wants humans to eat it. Or at least, others of its kind.

The title comes from the Dish of the Day sequence in Douglas Adams' The Restaurant at the End of the Universe, of The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy series. At the Restaurant, Arthur Dent is horrified to discover that the Dish of the Day is an intelligent herbivore bred to find fulfillment in being consumed. The cruelty, the Dish of the Day explains, lies not in eating animals, but in eating animals or plants who don't want to be eaten. Ironically, several science-fiction works written since have played this idea straight, often crossed with I'm a Humanitarian for maximum Nightmare Fuel.

There is, naturally, a great deal of cross-over with Carnivore Confusion. May also overlap with Fridge Horror, and more often than not with Cargo Envy. Can be horrifying, sick, or kind of funny depending on the person. For some reason, though, it is rarely Justified Trope by using fruit, which quite logically should want to be eaten so that the seeds will be spread.

The animal may start having second thoughts if it has a Veal Realization.


Let's Meet the Meat

There is a curious phenomenon in commercials in which edible animals or the post-prepared food and drink is given intelligence and the power of speech. And it wants humans to eat it. Or at least, others of its kind.

The title comes from the Dish of the Day sequence in Douglas Adams' The Restaurant at the End of the Universe, of The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy series. At the Restaurant, Arthur Dent is horrified to discover that the Dish of the Day is an intelligent herbivore bred to find fulfillment in being consumed. The cruelty, the Dish of the Day explains, lies not in eating animals, but in eating animals or plants who don't want to be eaten. Ironically, several science-fiction works written since have played this idea straight, often crossed with I'm a Humanitarian for maximum Nightmare Fuel.

There is, naturally, a great deal of cross-over with Carnivore Confusion. May also overlap with Fridge Horror, and more often than not with Cargo Envy. Can be horrifying, sick, or kind of funny depending on the person. For some reason, though, it is rarely Justified Trope by using fruit, which quite logically should want to be eaten so that the seeds will be spread.

The animal may start having second thoughts if it has a Veal Realization.


Let's Meet the Meat

There is a curious phenomenon in commercials in which edible animals or the post-prepared food and drink is given intelligence and the power of speech. And it wants humans to eat it. Or at least, others of its kind.

The title comes from the Dish of the Day sequence in Douglas Adams' The Restaurant at the End of the Universe, of The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy series. At the Restaurant, Arthur Dent is horrified to discover that the Dish of the Day is an intelligent herbivore bred to find fulfillment in being consumed. The cruelty, the Dish of the Day explains, lies not in eating animals, but in eating animals or plants who don't want to be eaten. Ironically, several science-fiction works written since have played this idea straight, often crossed with I'm a Humanitarian for maximum Nightmare Fuel.

There is, naturally, a great deal of cross-over with Carnivore Confusion. May also overlap with Fridge Horror, and more often than not with Cargo Envy. Can be horrifying, sick, or kind of funny depending on the person. For some reason, though, it is rarely Justified Trope by using fruit, which quite logically should want to be eaten so that the seeds will be spread.

The animal may start having second thoughts if it has a Veal Realization.


Let's Meet the Meat

There is a curious phenomenon in commercials in which edible animals or the post-prepared food and drink is given intelligence and the power of speech. And it wants humans to eat it. Or at least, others of its kind.

The title comes from the Dish of the Day sequence in Douglas Adams' The Restaurant at the End of the Universe, of The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy series. At the Restaurant, Arthur Dent is horrified to discover that the Dish of the Day is an intelligent herbivore bred to find fulfillment in being consumed. The cruelty, the Dish of the Day explains, lies not in eating animals, but in eating animals or plants who don't want to be eaten. Ironically, several science-fiction works written since have played this idea straight, often crossed with I'm a Humanitarian for maximum Nightmare Fuel.

There is, naturally, a great deal of cross-over with Carnivore Confusion. May also overlap with Fridge Horror, and more often than not with Cargo Envy. Can be horrifying, sick, or kind of funny depending on the person. For some reason, though, it is rarely Justified Trope by using fruit, which quite logically should want to be eaten so that the seeds will be spread.

The animal may start having second thoughts if it has a Veal Realization.


Let's Meet the Meat

There is a curious phenomenon in commercials in which edible animals or the post-prepared food and drink is given intelligence and the power of speech. And it wants humans to eat it. Or at least, others of its kind.

The title comes from the Dish of the Day sequence in Douglas Adams' The Restaurant at the End of the Universe, of The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy series. At the Restaurant, Arthur Dent is horrified to discover that the Dish of the Day is an intelligent herbivore bred to find fulfillment in being consumed. The cruelty, the Dish of the Day explains, lies not in eating animals, but in eating animals or plants who don't want to be eaten. Ironically, several science-fiction works written since have played this idea straight, often crossed with I'm a Humanitarian for maximum Nightmare Fuel.

There is, naturally, a great deal of cross-over with Carnivore Confusion. May also overlap with Fridge Horror, and more often than not with Cargo Envy. Can be horrifying, sick, or kind of funny depending on the person. For some reason, though, it is rarely Justified Trope by using fruit, which quite logically should want to be eaten so that the seeds will be spread.

The animal may start having second thoughts if it has a Veal Realization.


Watch the video: Τα Παιδιά του Χούριν. 09 Ο Θάνατος του Μπέλεγκ (July 2022).


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