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Food Nerd Day Trips from Boston

Food Nerd Day Trips from Boston


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One of the most unique parts of the Northeast, and Boston in particular, is the ability to skip from one state to another within a matter of hours. For that reason, our list of super fun day trips include not just Massachusetts but also Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Hampshire, and Maine. Start your engines...

Nantucket, Mass.

The ferry from Hyannis in Cape Cod takes you to Nantucket, an island that needs no introduction. But a food nerd (or hops head, as it may be) might want to take note: Cisco Brewers makes a special beer, among other notable microbrews, for Oleana Restaurant called Oleana 3-C Ale. They also host bluegrass nights and other music events. (Photo courtesy of flickr/heardsy)

Hopkinton, N.H.

Day-trippers will have to wait until May when the Beech Hill Farm and Ice Cream Barn re-opens on May 1, so for now you’ll have to be content surmising what seasonal ice cream flavors Beech Hill will have; what kind of fresh produce they will be selling at the farmstand; and which freshly baked goods will be available at the on-site bakery.

Berkshires, Mass.

Go for the gorgeous mountain-scapes, but the lactose-intolerant be warned. Culinary Institute of America grad turned award-winning chocolatier heads up the Chocolate Springs Café in Lenox, where truffles and hand-crafted chocolates are sold as well as cakes, mousses and ice cream. Then there's Rubiner's Cheesemongers, which has put Great Barrington on the cuilnary goods map. (Photo courtesy of flickr/essygie)

Cabbage Island and Wiscasset, Maine

This is where to get a real taste of New England. From Boothbay Harbor, a ferry drops you on Cabbage Island for a Nor’east clam bake, done the traditional way — steamed in seaweed underground. On the way, stop in at Red's in Wiscasset for one of the best lobster rolls to be had.

Providence, R.I.

Providence has its own rich culinary history (and its own special accent) informed by both Italian and Portuguese immigrants. The city has upped its cuteness quotient in recent times and has a burgeoning dining scene, the most celebrated restaurant being Al Forno, #65 on our 101 Best Restaurants list.

Newport, R.I.

Breeze through the Gilded Age mansions with an imaginary Champagne coupe in hand. Where to go to celebrate the high life? Our picks for great Newport dining: Mamma Luisa, The Clarke Cooke House, and Tallulah on Thames. (Photo courtesy of flickr/kables)


Mini Almond Cake with Raspberry Buttercream

I’m moving to Boston! I’m making a career move, and I couldn’t be more excited about it! I’ll be working for this fabulous start-up that will be extremely challenging but even more rewarding.

So I made this mini cake to celebrate and say goodbye to Long Island. Why mini? It’s a little bittersweet. I didn’t feel like being extravagant about it. I’ve made great friends and memories here, and it feels like I didn’t spend enough time here on The Island. However, I live by a personal motto that I go where the opportunities take me, so onto brighter and scarier things!

This little guy is an almond cake with a soft crumb topped with a raspberry buttercream and slivered almonds just because. If you’re familiar with the blogging world, you’ve seen many-a-mini cakes by the likes of Cynthia. They’re kind of magical because there are no eggs, so you can cut the batter into teeny tiny proportions.

How the heck does that work?

Well as we’ve chatted about before, eggs lend a lot of the structure to a cake. The egg whites, in particular, are pure protein and water, so they support the cake almost like scaffolding. The yolks follow up with some emulsifying power and extra fat which creates a more tender crumb .

These mini cakes are baked in such a small volume, and the batter is rather thick, that we can depend mainly on flour to give us enough structure to hold up the cake structure . But that’s only part of it.

The magic lies in the baking soda-vinegar mixture . Baking soda breaks down into carbon dioxide in the presence of moisture and heat. Carbon dioxide bubbles tunnel through the batter and provide leavening. But that will never give us enough leavening to do anything. So we add vinegar, an acid ! Think about the elementary school volcano science project. Vinegar reacts with the baking soda to rapidly produce carbon dioxide and water. That water turns to steam in the oven and also causes rapid expansion of the batter. It’s a one-two punch of a ton of gas bubbles causing a ton of rising of the cake.

That small volume we mentioned before? This is where that comes in. The heat causes the flour structure to set pretty quicklyaround the edges and move in toward the center just as quickly. That fast-set structure will trap the rapid expansion from the baking soda/acid and lock the tunnels from the gas bubbles in. And there we have it!

Now there is one more thing to mention. Greek yogurt plays a supporting role. The high protein content thickens the batter before it even goes into the oven slowing down the gas release. Then, in the oven, the protein helps to support the structure formed by the flour.

Okay, Kelsey. Wrap it up. You’re getting carried away. Anyway, all that food nerd talk translates into a fabulous mini cake that is perfect for small celebrations (like a move to Boston) or just because. Make sure that you put the batter right into the oven after mixing because the baking soda will begin to produce carbon dioxide quickly. Now get on this mini cake! Why not?!


Mini Almond Cake with Raspberry Buttercream

I’m moving to Boston! I’m making a career move, and I couldn’t be more excited about it! I’ll be working for this fabulous start-up that will be extremely challenging but even more rewarding.

So I made this mini cake to celebrate and say goodbye to Long Island. Why mini? It’s a little bittersweet. I didn’t feel like being extravagant about it. I’ve made great friends and memories here, and it feels like I didn’t spend enough time here on The Island. However, I live by a personal motto that I go where the opportunities take me, so onto brighter and scarier things!

This little guy is an almond cake with a soft crumb topped with a raspberry buttercream and slivered almonds just because. If you’re familiar with the blogging world, you’ve seen many-a-mini cakes by the likes of Cynthia. They’re kind of magical because there are no eggs, so you can cut the batter into teeny tiny proportions.

How the heck does that work?

Well as we’ve chatted about before, eggs lend a lot of the structure to a cake. The egg whites, in particular, are pure protein and water, so they support the cake almost like scaffolding. The yolks follow up with some emulsifying power and extra fat which creates a more tender crumb .

These mini cakes are baked in such a small volume, and the batter is rather thick, that we can depend mainly on flour to give us enough structure to hold up the cake structure . But that’s only part of it.

The magic lies in the baking soda-vinegar mixture . Baking soda breaks down into carbon dioxide in the presence of moisture and heat. Carbon dioxide bubbles tunnel through the batter and provide leavening. But that will never give us enough leavening to do anything. So we add vinegar, an acid ! Think about the elementary school volcano science project. Vinegar reacts with the baking soda to rapidly produce carbon dioxide and water. That water turns to steam in the oven and also causes rapid expansion of the batter. It’s a one-two punch of a ton of gas bubbles causing a ton of rising of the cake.

That small volume we mentioned before? This is where that comes in. The heat causes the flour structure to set pretty quicklyaround the edges and move in toward the center just as quickly. That fast-set structure will trap the rapid expansion from the baking soda/acid and lock the tunnels from the gas bubbles in. And there we have it!

Now there is one more thing to mention. Greek yogurt plays a supporting role. The high protein content thickens the batter before it even goes into the oven slowing down the gas release. Then, in the oven, the protein helps to support the structure formed by the flour.

Okay, Kelsey. Wrap it up. You’re getting carried away. Anyway, all that food nerd talk translates into a fabulous mini cake that is perfect for small celebrations (like a move to Boston) or just because. Make sure that you put the batter right into the oven after mixing because the baking soda will begin to produce carbon dioxide quickly. Now get on this mini cake! Why not?!


Mini Almond Cake with Raspberry Buttercream

I’m moving to Boston! I’m making a career move, and I couldn’t be more excited about it! I’ll be working for this fabulous start-up that will be extremely challenging but even more rewarding.

So I made this mini cake to celebrate and say goodbye to Long Island. Why mini? It’s a little bittersweet. I didn’t feel like being extravagant about it. I’ve made great friends and memories here, and it feels like I didn’t spend enough time here on The Island. However, I live by a personal motto that I go where the opportunities take me, so onto brighter and scarier things!

This little guy is an almond cake with a soft crumb topped with a raspberry buttercream and slivered almonds just because. If you’re familiar with the blogging world, you’ve seen many-a-mini cakes by the likes of Cynthia. They’re kind of magical because there are no eggs, so you can cut the batter into teeny tiny proportions.

How the heck does that work?

Well as we’ve chatted about before, eggs lend a lot of the structure to a cake. The egg whites, in particular, are pure protein and water, so they support the cake almost like scaffolding. The yolks follow up with some emulsifying power and extra fat which creates a more tender crumb .

These mini cakes are baked in such a small volume, and the batter is rather thick, that we can depend mainly on flour to give us enough structure to hold up the cake structure . But that’s only part of it.

The magic lies in the baking soda-vinegar mixture . Baking soda breaks down into carbon dioxide in the presence of moisture and heat. Carbon dioxide bubbles tunnel through the batter and provide leavening. But that will never give us enough leavening to do anything. So we add vinegar, an acid ! Think about the elementary school volcano science project. Vinegar reacts with the baking soda to rapidly produce carbon dioxide and water. That water turns to steam in the oven and also causes rapid expansion of the batter. It’s a one-two punch of a ton of gas bubbles causing a ton of rising of the cake.

That small volume we mentioned before? This is where that comes in. The heat causes the flour structure to set pretty quicklyaround the edges and move in toward the center just as quickly. That fast-set structure will trap the rapid expansion from the baking soda/acid and lock the tunnels from the gas bubbles in. And there we have it!

Now there is one more thing to mention. Greek yogurt plays a supporting role. The high protein content thickens the batter before it even goes into the oven slowing down the gas release. Then, in the oven, the protein helps to support the structure formed by the flour.

Okay, Kelsey. Wrap it up. You’re getting carried away. Anyway, all that food nerd talk translates into a fabulous mini cake that is perfect for small celebrations (like a move to Boston) or just because. Make sure that you put the batter right into the oven after mixing because the baking soda will begin to produce carbon dioxide quickly. Now get on this mini cake! Why not?!


Mini Almond Cake with Raspberry Buttercream

I’m moving to Boston! I’m making a career move, and I couldn’t be more excited about it! I’ll be working for this fabulous start-up that will be extremely challenging but even more rewarding.

So I made this mini cake to celebrate and say goodbye to Long Island. Why mini? It’s a little bittersweet. I didn’t feel like being extravagant about it. I’ve made great friends and memories here, and it feels like I didn’t spend enough time here on The Island. However, I live by a personal motto that I go where the opportunities take me, so onto brighter and scarier things!

This little guy is an almond cake with a soft crumb topped with a raspberry buttercream and slivered almonds just because. If you’re familiar with the blogging world, you’ve seen many-a-mini cakes by the likes of Cynthia. They’re kind of magical because there are no eggs, so you can cut the batter into teeny tiny proportions.

How the heck does that work?

Well as we’ve chatted about before, eggs lend a lot of the structure to a cake. The egg whites, in particular, are pure protein and water, so they support the cake almost like scaffolding. The yolks follow up with some emulsifying power and extra fat which creates a more tender crumb .

These mini cakes are baked in such a small volume, and the batter is rather thick, that we can depend mainly on flour to give us enough structure to hold up the cake structure . But that’s only part of it.

The magic lies in the baking soda-vinegar mixture . Baking soda breaks down into carbon dioxide in the presence of moisture and heat. Carbon dioxide bubbles tunnel through the batter and provide leavening. But that will never give us enough leavening to do anything. So we add vinegar, an acid ! Think about the elementary school volcano science project. Vinegar reacts with the baking soda to rapidly produce carbon dioxide and water. That water turns to steam in the oven and also causes rapid expansion of the batter. It’s a one-two punch of a ton of gas bubbles causing a ton of rising of the cake.

That small volume we mentioned before? This is where that comes in. The heat causes the flour structure to set pretty quicklyaround the edges and move in toward the center just as quickly. That fast-set structure will trap the rapid expansion from the baking soda/acid and lock the tunnels from the gas bubbles in. And there we have it!

Now there is one more thing to mention. Greek yogurt plays a supporting role. The high protein content thickens the batter before it even goes into the oven slowing down the gas release. Then, in the oven, the protein helps to support the structure formed by the flour.

Okay, Kelsey. Wrap it up. You’re getting carried away. Anyway, all that food nerd talk translates into a fabulous mini cake that is perfect for small celebrations (like a move to Boston) or just because. Make sure that you put the batter right into the oven after mixing because the baking soda will begin to produce carbon dioxide quickly. Now get on this mini cake! Why not?!


Mini Almond Cake with Raspberry Buttercream

I’m moving to Boston! I’m making a career move, and I couldn’t be more excited about it! I’ll be working for this fabulous start-up that will be extremely challenging but even more rewarding.

So I made this mini cake to celebrate and say goodbye to Long Island. Why mini? It’s a little bittersweet. I didn’t feel like being extravagant about it. I’ve made great friends and memories here, and it feels like I didn’t spend enough time here on The Island. However, I live by a personal motto that I go where the opportunities take me, so onto brighter and scarier things!

This little guy is an almond cake with a soft crumb topped with a raspberry buttercream and slivered almonds just because. If you’re familiar with the blogging world, you’ve seen many-a-mini cakes by the likes of Cynthia. They’re kind of magical because there are no eggs, so you can cut the batter into teeny tiny proportions.

How the heck does that work?

Well as we’ve chatted about before, eggs lend a lot of the structure to a cake. The egg whites, in particular, are pure protein and water, so they support the cake almost like scaffolding. The yolks follow up with some emulsifying power and extra fat which creates a more tender crumb .

These mini cakes are baked in such a small volume, and the batter is rather thick, that we can depend mainly on flour to give us enough structure to hold up the cake structure . But that’s only part of it.

The magic lies in the baking soda-vinegar mixture . Baking soda breaks down into carbon dioxide in the presence of moisture and heat. Carbon dioxide bubbles tunnel through the batter and provide leavening. But that will never give us enough leavening to do anything. So we add vinegar, an acid ! Think about the elementary school volcano science project. Vinegar reacts with the baking soda to rapidly produce carbon dioxide and water. That water turns to steam in the oven and also causes rapid expansion of the batter. It’s a one-two punch of a ton of gas bubbles causing a ton of rising of the cake.

That small volume we mentioned before? This is where that comes in. The heat causes the flour structure to set pretty quicklyaround the edges and move in toward the center just as quickly. That fast-set structure will trap the rapid expansion from the baking soda/acid and lock the tunnels from the gas bubbles in. And there we have it!

Now there is one more thing to mention. Greek yogurt plays a supporting role. The high protein content thickens the batter before it even goes into the oven slowing down the gas release. Then, in the oven, the protein helps to support the structure formed by the flour.

Okay, Kelsey. Wrap it up. You’re getting carried away. Anyway, all that food nerd talk translates into a fabulous mini cake that is perfect for small celebrations (like a move to Boston) or just because. Make sure that you put the batter right into the oven after mixing because the baking soda will begin to produce carbon dioxide quickly. Now get on this mini cake! Why not?!


Mini Almond Cake with Raspberry Buttercream

I’m moving to Boston! I’m making a career move, and I couldn’t be more excited about it! I’ll be working for this fabulous start-up that will be extremely challenging but even more rewarding.

So I made this mini cake to celebrate and say goodbye to Long Island. Why mini? It’s a little bittersweet. I didn’t feel like being extravagant about it. I’ve made great friends and memories here, and it feels like I didn’t spend enough time here on The Island. However, I live by a personal motto that I go where the opportunities take me, so onto brighter and scarier things!

This little guy is an almond cake with a soft crumb topped with a raspberry buttercream and slivered almonds just because. If you’re familiar with the blogging world, you’ve seen many-a-mini cakes by the likes of Cynthia. They’re kind of magical because there are no eggs, so you can cut the batter into teeny tiny proportions.

How the heck does that work?

Well as we’ve chatted about before, eggs lend a lot of the structure to a cake. The egg whites, in particular, are pure protein and water, so they support the cake almost like scaffolding. The yolks follow up with some emulsifying power and extra fat which creates a more tender crumb .

These mini cakes are baked in such a small volume, and the batter is rather thick, that we can depend mainly on flour to give us enough structure to hold up the cake structure . But that’s only part of it.

The magic lies in the baking soda-vinegar mixture . Baking soda breaks down into carbon dioxide in the presence of moisture and heat. Carbon dioxide bubbles tunnel through the batter and provide leavening. But that will never give us enough leavening to do anything. So we add vinegar, an acid ! Think about the elementary school volcano science project. Vinegar reacts with the baking soda to rapidly produce carbon dioxide and water. That water turns to steam in the oven and also causes rapid expansion of the batter. It’s a one-two punch of a ton of gas bubbles causing a ton of rising of the cake.

That small volume we mentioned before? This is where that comes in. The heat causes the flour structure to set pretty quicklyaround the edges and move in toward the center just as quickly. That fast-set structure will trap the rapid expansion from the baking soda/acid and lock the tunnels from the gas bubbles in. And there we have it!

Now there is one more thing to mention. Greek yogurt plays a supporting role. The high protein content thickens the batter before it even goes into the oven slowing down the gas release. Then, in the oven, the protein helps to support the structure formed by the flour.

Okay, Kelsey. Wrap it up. You’re getting carried away. Anyway, all that food nerd talk translates into a fabulous mini cake that is perfect for small celebrations (like a move to Boston) or just because. Make sure that you put the batter right into the oven after mixing because the baking soda will begin to produce carbon dioxide quickly. Now get on this mini cake! Why not?!


Mini Almond Cake with Raspberry Buttercream

I’m moving to Boston! I’m making a career move, and I couldn’t be more excited about it! I’ll be working for this fabulous start-up that will be extremely challenging but even more rewarding.

So I made this mini cake to celebrate and say goodbye to Long Island. Why mini? It’s a little bittersweet. I didn’t feel like being extravagant about it. I’ve made great friends and memories here, and it feels like I didn’t spend enough time here on The Island. However, I live by a personal motto that I go where the opportunities take me, so onto brighter and scarier things!

This little guy is an almond cake with a soft crumb topped with a raspberry buttercream and slivered almonds just because. If you’re familiar with the blogging world, you’ve seen many-a-mini cakes by the likes of Cynthia. They’re kind of magical because there are no eggs, so you can cut the batter into teeny tiny proportions.

How the heck does that work?

Well as we’ve chatted about before, eggs lend a lot of the structure to a cake. The egg whites, in particular, are pure protein and water, so they support the cake almost like scaffolding. The yolks follow up with some emulsifying power and extra fat which creates a more tender crumb .

These mini cakes are baked in such a small volume, and the batter is rather thick, that we can depend mainly on flour to give us enough structure to hold up the cake structure . But that’s only part of it.

The magic lies in the baking soda-vinegar mixture . Baking soda breaks down into carbon dioxide in the presence of moisture and heat. Carbon dioxide bubbles tunnel through the batter and provide leavening. But that will never give us enough leavening to do anything. So we add vinegar, an acid ! Think about the elementary school volcano science project. Vinegar reacts with the baking soda to rapidly produce carbon dioxide and water. That water turns to steam in the oven and also causes rapid expansion of the batter. It’s a one-two punch of a ton of gas bubbles causing a ton of rising of the cake.

That small volume we mentioned before? This is where that comes in. The heat causes the flour structure to set pretty quicklyaround the edges and move in toward the center just as quickly. That fast-set structure will trap the rapid expansion from the baking soda/acid and lock the tunnels from the gas bubbles in. And there we have it!

Now there is one more thing to mention. Greek yogurt plays a supporting role. The high protein content thickens the batter before it even goes into the oven slowing down the gas release. Then, in the oven, the protein helps to support the structure formed by the flour.

Okay, Kelsey. Wrap it up. You’re getting carried away. Anyway, all that food nerd talk translates into a fabulous mini cake that is perfect for small celebrations (like a move to Boston) or just because. Make sure that you put the batter right into the oven after mixing because the baking soda will begin to produce carbon dioxide quickly. Now get on this mini cake! Why not?!


Mini Almond Cake with Raspberry Buttercream

I’m moving to Boston! I’m making a career move, and I couldn’t be more excited about it! I’ll be working for this fabulous start-up that will be extremely challenging but even more rewarding.

So I made this mini cake to celebrate and say goodbye to Long Island. Why mini? It’s a little bittersweet. I didn’t feel like being extravagant about it. I’ve made great friends and memories here, and it feels like I didn’t spend enough time here on The Island. However, I live by a personal motto that I go where the opportunities take me, so onto brighter and scarier things!

This little guy is an almond cake with a soft crumb topped with a raspberry buttercream and slivered almonds just because. If you’re familiar with the blogging world, you’ve seen many-a-mini cakes by the likes of Cynthia. They’re kind of magical because there are no eggs, so you can cut the batter into teeny tiny proportions.

How the heck does that work?

Well as we’ve chatted about before, eggs lend a lot of the structure to a cake. The egg whites, in particular, are pure protein and water, so they support the cake almost like scaffolding. The yolks follow up with some emulsifying power and extra fat which creates a more tender crumb .

These mini cakes are baked in such a small volume, and the batter is rather thick, that we can depend mainly on flour to give us enough structure to hold up the cake structure . But that’s only part of it.

The magic lies in the baking soda-vinegar mixture . Baking soda breaks down into carbon dioxide in the presence of moisture and heat. Carbon dioxide bubbles tunnel through the batter and provide leavening. But that will never give us enough leavening to do anything. So we add vinegar, an acid ! Think about the elementary school volcano science project. Vinegar reacts with the baking soda to rapidly produce carbon dioxide and water. That water turns to steam in the oven and also causes rapid expansion of the batter. It’s a one-two punch of a ton of gas bubbles causing a ton of rising of the cake.

That small volume we mentioned before? This is where that comes in. The heat causes the flour structure to set pretty quicklyaround the edges and move in toward the center just as quickly. That fast-set structure will trap the rapid expansion from the baking soda/acid and lock the tunnels from the gas bubbles in. And there we have it!

Now there is one more thing to mention. Greek yogurt plays a supporting role. The high protein content thickens the batter before it even goes into the oven slowing down the gas release. Then, in the oven, the protein helps to support the structure formed by the flour.

Okay, Kelsey. Wrap it up. You’re getting carried away. Anyway, all that food nerd talk translates into a fabulous mini cake that is perfect for small celebrations (like a move to Boston) or just because. Make sure that you put the batter right into the oven after mixing because the baking soda will begin to produce carbon dioxide quickly. Now get on this mini cake! Why not?!


Mini Almond Cake with Raspberry Buttercream

I’m moving to Boston! I’m making a career move, and I couldn’t be more excited about it! I’ll be working for this fabulous start-up that will be extremely challenging but even more rewarding.

So I made this mini cake to celebrate and say goodbye to Long Island. Why mini? It’s a little bittersweet. I didn’t feel like being extravagant about it. I’ve made great friends and memories here, and it feels like I didn’t spend enough time here on The Island. However, I live by a personal motto that I go where the opportunities take me, so onto brighter and scarier things!

This little guy is an almond cake with a soft crumb topped with a raspberry buttercream and slivered almonds just because. If you’re familiar with the blogging world, you’ve seen many-a-mini cakes by the likes of Cynthia. They’re kind of magical because there are no eggs, so you can cut the batter into teeny tiny proportions.

How the heck does that work?

Well as we’ve chatted about before, eggs lend a lot of the structure to a cake. The egg whites, in particular, are pure protein and water, so they support the cake almost like scaffolding. The yolks follow up with some emulsifying power and extra fat which creates a more tender crumb .

These mini cakes are baked in such a small volume, and the batter is rather thick, that we can depend mainly on flour to give us enough structure to hold up the cake structure . But that’s only part of it.

The magic lies in the baking soda-vinegar mixture . Baking soda breaks down into carbon dioxide in the presence of moisture and heat. Carbon dioxide bubbles tunnel through the batter and provide leavening. But that will never give us enough leavening to do anything. So we add vinegar, an acid ! Think about the elementary school volcano science project. Vinegar reacts with the baking soda to rapidly produce carbon dioxide and water. That water turns to steam in the oven and also causes rapid expansion of the batter. It’s a one-two punch of a ton of gas bubbles causing a ton of rising of the cake.

That small volume we mentioned before? This is where that comes in. The heat causes the flour structure to set pretty quicklyaround the edges and move in toward the center just as quickly. That fast-set structure will trap the rapid expansion from the baking soda/acid and lock the tunnels from the gas bubbles in. And there we have it!

Now there is one more thing to mention. Greek yogurt plays a supporting role. The high protein content thickens the batter before it even goes into the oven slowing down the gas release. Then, in the oven, the protein helps to support the structure formed by the flour.

Okay, Kelsey. Wrap it up. You’re getting carried away. Anyway, all that food nerd talk translates into a fabulous mini cake that is perfect for small celebrations (like a move to Boston) or just because. Make sure that you put the batter right into the oven after mixing because the baking soda will begin to produce carbon dioxide quickly. Now get on this mini cake! Why not?!


Mini Almond Cake with Raspberry Buttercream

I’m moving to Boston! I’m making a career move, and I couldn’t be more excited about it! I’ll be working for this fabulous start-up that will be extremely challenging but even more rewarding.

So I made this mini cake to celebrate and say goodbye to Long Island. Why mini? It’s a little bittersweet. I didn’t feel like being extravagant about it. I’ve made great friends and memories here, and it feels like I didn’t spend enough time here on The Island. However, I live by a personal motto that I go where the opportunities take me, so onto brighter and scarier things!

This little guy is an almond cake with a soft crumb topped with a raspberry buttercream and slivered almonds just because. If you’re familiar with the blogging world, you’ve seen many-a-mini cakes by the likes of Cynthia. They’re kind of magical because there are no eggs, so you can cut the batter into teeny tiny proportions.

How the heck does that work?

Well as we’ve chatted about before, eggs lend a lot of the structure to a cake. The egg whites, in particular, are pure protein and water, so they support the cake almost like scaffolding. The yolks follow up with some emulsifying power and extra fat which creates a more tender crumb .

These mini cakes are baked in such a small volume, and the batter is rather thick, that we can depend mainly on flour to give us enough structure to hold up the cake structure . But that’s only part of it.

The magic lies in the baking soda-vinegar mixture . Baking soda breaks down into carbon dioxide in the presence of moisture and heat. Carbon dioxide bubbles tunnel through the batter and provide leavening. But that will never give us enough leavening to do anything. So we add vinegar, an acid ! Think about the elementary school volcano science project. Vinegar reacts with the baking soda to rapidly produce carbon dioxide and water. That water turns to steam in the oven and also causes rapid expansion of the batter. It’s a one-two punch of a ton of gas bubbles causing a ton of rising of the cake.

That small volume we mentioned before? This is where that comes in. The heat causes the flour structure to set pretty quicklyaround the edges and move in toward the center just as quickly. That fast-set structure will trap the rapid expansion from the baking soda/acid and lock the tunnels from the gas bubbles in. And there we have it!

Now there is one more thing to mention. Greek yogurt plays a supporting role. The high protein content thickens the batter before it even goes into the oven slowing down the gas release. Then, in the oven, the protein helps to support the structure formed by the flour.

Okay, Kelsey. Wrap it up. You’re getting carried away. Anyway, all that food nerd talk translates into a fabulous mini cake that is perfect for small celebrations (like a move to Boston) or just because. Make sure that you put the batter right into the oven after mixing because the baking soda will begin to produce carbon dioxide quickly. Now get on this mini cake! Why not?!



Comments:

  1. Culann

    I am final, I am sorry, but it is all does not approach. There are other variants?

  2. Barnett

    Sorry, I thought, and removed your idea

  3. Chibale

    I am probably wrong.

  4. Arat

    I apologise, but this variant does not approach me.

  5. Dalyell

    I confirm. And with this I have come across.



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